Oil burning torch

Abstract

An oil burning torch is described. The torch includes a fuel canister, a wick; and a wick support. The wick and said wick support are mounted to said fuel canister to position said wick for use, and a canister lid is sealingly engaged to said fuel canister and surrounding said wick support.

Claims

What is claimed is: 1 . An oil burning torch comprising: a fuel canister; a wick; a wick support, said wick and said wick support mounted to said fuel canister to position said wick for use; and a canister lid sealingly engaged to said fuel canister and surrounding said wick support. 2 . A torch in accordance with claim 1 further comprising a support body for receiving said canister. 3 . A torch in accordance with claim 2 wherein said body comprises a plurality of longitudinally extending fins. 4 . A torch in accordance with claim 3 further comprising a heat shield support extending from an end of said fins. 5 . A torch in accordance with claim 3 wherein at least one of said fins comprises an elongated slot therein. 6 . A torch in accordance with claim 1 wherein said lid is configured to extinguish a torch flame. 7 . A torch in accordance with claim 6 wherein said lid comprises a metal inner portion and a plastic outer portion. 8 . An oil burning torch comprising: a support body; a fuel canister received in said support body, and a canister lid comprising a seal member, said lid threadably engaged to said canister. 9 . An oil burning torch in accordance with claim 8 wherein said lid comprises a metal portion and a nonmetal portion. 10 . An oil burning torch in accordance with claim 8 wherein said seal member comprises an o-ring gasket. 11 . An oil burning torch in accordance with claim 8 , said support body comprising at least one slot therein for receiving said lid. 12 . An oil burning torch in accordance with claim 11 , said support body comprising at least one fin, said slot extending in said fin. 13 . An oil burning torch comprising: a pre-filled fuel canister comprising an outer surface; a canister lid threadably and sealingly engaged to said fuel canister; a support body receiving said outer surface of said fuel canister; said support body comprising at least one fin, said at least one fin separated from said outer surface when said canister is received in said support body. 14 . An oil burning torch in accordance with claim 13 further comprising a heat shield supported on said canister and supported on said support body. 15 . An oil burning torch in accordance with claim 13 wherein said canister lid comprises a seal member therein. 16 . An oil burning torch in accordance with claim 13 , said at least one fin comprising a slot therein for receiving said canister lid when said canister lid is removed from said canister. 17 . An oil burning torch in accordance with claim 16 , said canister comprising an upper portion, said support body comprising a plurality of fins and a support ring connecting one end of said fins, said support ring supporting said upper portion of said canister when said canister is received in said support body. 18 . A method for assembling an oil burning torch including a fuel canister, a wick, a wick support and a lid, said method comprising: filling the fuel canister with a fuel; mounting the wick to the canister with the wick support; and sealing the canister with the lid. 19 . A method in accordance with claim 18 , the torch including a support body including a plurality of longitudinally extending vertical fins the method further comprising inserting the fuel canister into the support body. 20 . A method for manufacturing an oil burning torch including a sealed fuel canister, said method comprising: filling the canister with a torch fuel; sealing the canister; and supplying the sealed canister to a torch user after the canister is filled. 21 . A method in accordance with claim 20 said sealing the canister comprising attaching a lid to the canister, the lid including a sealing member. 22 . A method in accordance with claim 21 further comprising mounting a wick to the canister with a wick support before sealing the canister. 23 . A method for lighting an oil burning torch, the torch including a pre-filled fuel canister including a wick therein and a lid sealingly engaged to the canister, a body support adapted to receive the fuel canister, and a pole for supporting the body support, the body support including at least one fin having a slot therein, said method comprising: engaging the body support to one end of the pole; inserting the other end of the pole into the ground such that the support body is supported at a distance above the ground; removing the lid from the canister; inserting the lid into the slot in the fin; placing the canister into the body support; and lighting the wick.. 24 . A method in accordance with claim 23 , the torch further including a heat shield, said method further comprising placing the heat shield over the canister.
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS [0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/277,310 filed Mar. 20, 2001. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION [0002] This invention relates generally to outdoor oil burning torches and, more particularly, to citronella torches. [0003] Citronella torches, sometimes referred to as garden torches, are used to illuminate outdoor areas while providing a festive or tropical atmosphere and while further providing at least some protection from biting insects, such as mosquitoes, in the vicinity of the torch. Typically, a citronella torch is mounted on a pole such that the flame is one and one-half to three meters above ground level, thereby positioning the torch flame and repelling insects at a height sufficient to safely create a barrier in a designated area around the torch, such as a deck or patio. [0004] Conventional citronella torches include a refillable fuel container for receiving a fuel oil or other flammable liquid, and a removable wick holder attached thereto. A wick is inserted into the container through the wick holder and through a top opening in the fuel container, and the fuel is delivered to an open flame at the top of the wick via capillary action. The fuel container is held in a generally upright position within a basket frame that is mounted on a ground-engaging pole, and a flame guard is mounted on the top surface of the fuel container to protect the fuel container and the basket from the flame. [0005] This type of citronella torch construction is disadvantaged in at least two notable aspects. For example, while the removable wick holder allows a user to fill or refill the fuel container and/or insert a new wick into the fuel container as necessary, the removable wick holder is unsatisfactory in that it inadequately seals the fuel container. While sealing issues are conventionally overcome from a manufacturing and retail perspective by shipping and selling garden torches and fuel oils separately, poor sealing of the fuel container remains an issue when using, moving, or storing torches with fuel oil in the fuel containers. Aside from spilled or leaking fuel creating a mess, inadequate sealing of the fuel container can produce hazardous conditions when the torch is lit. [0006] In addition, heat generated by the open flame in known citronella torches can undesirably elevate an operating temperature of the basket and the fuel container by conduction and radiation heat transfer. Elevated temperatures of the fuel container and the basket can also create hazardous conditions around the torch, reduce a useable life of the torch, and increase fuel consumption of the torch. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION [0007] In one aspect, an oil burning torch is provided. The torch comprises a fuel canister, a wick, and a wick support. The wick and said wick support are mounted to said fuel canister to position said wick for use, and a canister lid is sealingly engaged to said fuel canister and surrounding said wick support. [0008] In another aspect, an oil burning torch comprising a support body, a fuel canister received in said support body, and a canister lid comprising a seal member is provided. The lid is threadably engaged to said canister. [0009] In another aspect, an oil burning torch is provided. The torch comprises a pre-filled fuel canister comprising an outer surface, a canister lid threadably and sealingly engaged to said fuel canister, and a support body receiving said outer surface of said fuel canister. The support body comprises at least one fin, said at least one fin separated from said outer surface when said canister is received in said support body. [0010] In another aspect, a method for assembling an oil burning torch including a fuel canister, a wick, a wick support and a lid is provided. The method comprises filling the fuel canister with a fuel, mounting the wick to the canister with the wick support, and sealing the canister with the lid. [0011] In another aspect, a method for manufacturing an oil burning torch including a sealed fuel canister is provided. The method comprises filling the canister with a torch fuel, sealing the canister; and supplying the sealed canister to a torch user after the canister is filled. [0012] In still another aspect, a method for lighting an oil burning torch is provided. The torch includes a pre-filled fuel canister including a wick therein and a lid sealingly engaged to the canister, a body support adapted to receive the fuel canister, and a pole for supporting the body support. The body support includes at least one fin having a slot therein. The method comprises engaging the body support to one end of the pole, inserting the other end of the pole into the ground such that the support body is supported at a distance above the ground, removing the lid from the canister, inserting the lid into the slot in the fin, placing the canister into the body support, and lighting the wick. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS [0013] [0013]FIG. 1 is an schematic elevational view of an oil burning torch. [0014] [0014]FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the torch support shown in FIG. 1. [0015] [0015]FIG. 3 is an exploded elevational view of a torch fuel canister assembly shown in FIG. 1. [0016] [0016]FIG. 4 is an elevational view of a portion of the canister lid shown in FIG. 3. [0017] [0017]FIG. 5 is atop plan of the canister lid shown in FIG. 4. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION [0018] [0018]FIG. 1 is a schematic elevational view of an oil burning torch 10 including a canister 12 containing a liquid fuel, a support body 14 surrounding canister 12 , and a heat shield 16 . For clarity, FIGS. 2 and 3 separately illustrate body support 14 and a canister assembly, while for brevity FIGS. 1 - 3 are described collectively. [0019] Canister 12 includes a generally cylindrical outer surface 18 and a canister neck 20 including at least one wick support 22 mounted therein. A wick 24 (shown in phantom in FIG. 3) extends into canister 12 and is maintained in a substantially vertical orientation by wick support 22 . In an illustrative embodiment, neck 20 includes threads 21 (shown in FIG. 3) for threaded engagement with a lid 26 when torch 10 is not in use. [0020] A variety of known liquid fuels may be employed in fuel canister 12 for producing a flame when wick 24 is lit. In one embodiment, the fuel is a known oil-based fuel including a small amount of citronella to create a generally insect free environment in the general vicinity of torch 10 in use. In alternative embodiments, other known liquid fuels could be employed in torch 10 , such as, for example, alcohol based fuels, and a variety of known fragrances, insect repellants, etc. could be added to the fuel for dispersal into the atmosphere as the fuel is consumed. Wick 24 extends through canister neck 20 and extends toward a bottom portion 28 of fuel canister 12 so that substantially all of the fuel in canister 12 may be consumed through capillary action in wick 24 to an open flame at the top of wick 24 . [0021] To avoid sealing issues with wick 24 and wick support 22 , and unlike conventional oil burning torches, wick 24 and wick support 22 are firmly coupled to or securely mounted or affixed to fuel canister 12 , and more specifically to fuel canister neck 20 . As such, unlike conventional oil burning torches, wick support 22 and wick 24 are generally not intended to be separated from one another, and canister 12 is generally not intended for reuse when fuel therein is depleted. Together with lid 26 (described further below), wick 24 and wick support 22 facilitate sealing of canister 12 in manufacturing operations after the fuel is introduced to fuel canister 12 . [0022] Consequently, because fuel canister 12 is sealed at the factory when wick 24 , wick support 22 , and lid 26 are attached to canister 12 , canister 12 may be shipped and sold pre-filled with fuel without undesirable leakage of canisters 12 that is practically inevitable when conventional torches including removable wicks and wick supports are filled with fuel and subjected to typical shipping operations. Thus, convenience to the user is increased by providing an off-the-shelf ready for use torch 10 that may be simply be positioned and lighted for use. Unlike conventional torches, the user need not disassemble the torch to fill the fuel canister, need not separately purchase and store fuel for the torch, and need not experience common messes, fuel spills, and frustration of filling the fuel canister with fuel before use. [0023] In addition, potential hazardous conditions because of insufficient sealing of fuel canister 12 during use or reuse of torch 10 are avoided. When fuel is depleted in canister 12 , canister 12 is removed and replaced with another pre-filled and securely sealed fuel canister 12 until lid 26 is removed for use. Disassembly of torch 10 and fuel canister 12 , refilling of canister 12 , and re-assembly of wick 24 , wick support 22 and torch 10 , as in conventional garden torches, is avoided, and so is the attendant risk of improper assembly and unsafe refilling and fuel handling practices. [0024] For all the above reasons, a more convenient, safer and easy to use torch 10 is therefore provided in comparison to known garden torches from a consumer perspective. Further, form a manufacturer's perspective, pre-filled or pre-loaded fuel canisters 12 may be shipped and sold in a more cost effective and convenient manner than conventionally separate packaging and distribution of the canister and the fuel. [0025] In addition, canister support body 14 receives fuel canister 12 and facilitates improved air flow and around fuel canister 12 for improved heat transfer from canister 12 to the ambient environment in another aspect of the invention, thereby further increasing performance, safety, and enjoyment of torch 10 . [0026] More specifically, support body 14 includes an open cup-shaped receptacle 29 having a plurality of support shoulders 30 projecting radially inwardly from an interior surface 31 (shown in FIG. 2) of receptacle 29 . In an exemplary embodiment, receptacle 29 includes four support shoulders spaced approximately 90° from one another about receptacle inner surface 31 . It is contemplated, however, that greater or fewer support shoulders may be employed in alternative embodiments. [0027] Canister bottom portion 28 rests upon and are supported by support shoulders 30 when canister bottom portion 28 is extended through a top opening 33 (shown in FIG. 2) in receptacle 29 . A plurality of vertical fins 32 longitudinally extend from receptacle 29 opposite support shoulders 30 from an exterior surface 35 of receptacle 29 . Each fin 32 includes a termination end 34 positioned opposite of canister bottom portion 28 (FIG. 1), and fin termination ends 34 are coupled to one another by a heat shield support ring 42 (described below). Receptacle 29 , fins 32 , and support ring 42 collectively define a sturdy structure to support canister 12 on bottom portion 28 and along canister outer surface 18 . [0028] In an exemplary embodiment, body 14 includes four vertically extending fins 32 , each having a depth 35 , a substantially linear inner edge 36 , and an arcuate outer edge 38 . In an illustrative embodiment, width 39 is about four times depth 35 , and fin inner edges 36 are generally separated from canister outer surface 18 when canister 12 is supported on support shoulders 30 in normal operation. [0029] The aspect ratio of fin width and depth is selected so that support body 14 allows torch 10 to be supported against a flat external object, such as, for example, a wall or the ground, while preventing canister outer surface 18 from contacting the object. Foreign objects of a selected size are also prevented from contacting fins 32 when torch 10 is in use. Each fin 32 in an illustrative embodiment is separated from adjacent fins 32 by approximately 90° and at least one fin 32 includes an elongated slot 40 extending obliquely from outer edge 38 to inner edge 36 . In addition, as further explained below, vertical fins 32 facilitate improved airflow around canister 12 in comparison to known torches, thereby producing a cooler burning torch 10 . [0030] In an alternative embodiment, greater or fewer than four fins 32 are employed at equal or unequal spacing relative to one another. In further alternative embodiments, fin width and depth ratios of greater or lesser than the above described embodiment are employed. [0031] A heat shield support 42 extends from and between fin termination ends 34 and forms a support ring adjacent to and connecting fin ends 34 . Heat shield support 42 includes a first rim portion 44 (shown in FIG. 2) and a second rim portion 46 concentric with first rim portion 44 . First rim portion 44 has a larger diameter than second rim portion 46 , and first rim portion 44 is vertically distanced from second rim portion 46 In an exemplary embodiment, heat shield support 42 is a substantially annular ring that connects fins 32 at termination ends 34 and provides a canister support at an upper portion 47 (shown in FIG. 3) of canister outer surface 18 . By supporting an upper portion of canister 12 , a separation of fin inner edges 36 and canister outer surface 18 is maintained when canister 12 is supported on shoulders 30 at canister bottom portion 28 . [0032] In an exemplary embodiment, heat shield support rims portions 44 and 46 are integrally formed with body 14 and fabricated from a thermoplastic material that is a poor heat conductor. In alternative embodiments, support rim portions 44 and 46 are separately provided. [0033] A plurality of ribs 50 extend from and beneath body support for engagement to a support pole 52 . In an exemplary embodiment, ribs 50 are dimensioned to be slightly larger than an inner diameter of one end 54 of pole 52 . Body 14 is therefore frictionally mounted with a slight interference fit to pole 52 . An opposite end of pole 52 is inserted into the ground such that the ground supports pole 52 in a substantially upright position. [0034] Heat shield 16 rests on heat shield support 42 such that a gap 55 is formed between a top surface 56 of canister 12 and heat shield 16 , thereby avoiding conductive heat transfer from heat shield 16 to canister 12 when wick 24 is lit. Heat shield 52 includes an aperture 58 that is shaped and dimensioned to allow canister neck 20 to pass therethrough. In a further embodiment, heat shield aperture 58 is shaped and dimensioned to allow neck 20 to pass therethrough while preventing canister lid 26 from passing therethrough. [0035] In use, pole 52 is inserted into the ground such that canister 12 is positioned substantially upright relative to the earth on support body 14 , and more specifically upon support shoulders 30 of receptacle 29 . Canister lid 26 is removed and placed in fin slot 40 for convenient storage proximate to oil burning torch 10 when torch 10 is used, thereby minimizing possible loss of lid 26 when torch 10 is used. In further embodiments, canister lid 26 includes a chain, cord, or other linking member to attach canister lid 26 to torch 10 and prevent cap 26 from separation and loss. [0036] Once canister lid 26 is removed, wick 24 is ignited by a heat source such as a flame from a match or a lighter. Fuel inside canister 12 is delivered to the flame vie capillary action through wick 24 , and the fuel is combusted at the top of wick 24 . A flame is thereby generated for illumination and disbursement of any applicable fuel fragrances, repellant materials, etc., such as citronella in one embodiment, into the atmosphere surrounding torch 10 . Accordingly, insects, such as mosquitoes, in proximity to torch 10 are repelled to produce an enjoyable outdoor environment around torch 10 . [0037] The open flame generated in use of torch 10 generates thermal energy which increases a temperature of heat shield 16 . However, vertically extending fins 32 of canister support body 14 provide for substantially unimpeded longitudinal airflow about outer surface 18 of canister 20 , and a separation of fin inner edges 36 from canister outer surface 18 provides for substantially unimpeded air flow circumferentially around canister outer surface 18 . Gap 55 between heat shield 16 and canister top surface 56 prevents conductive heat transfer between heat shield 16 and fins 32 . Thus, in comparison to known garden torches including basket frames, canister 12 provides improved ventilation of canister 12 , avoids conductive heat transfer to body 14 and canister 12 , and therefore facilitates a cooler burning torch 10 . A safer, longer life, and extended burning torch is therefore provided. [0038] When the benefits of torch 10 are no longer desired, canister lid 26 is removed from slot 40 and is used to extinguish the flame burning on wick 24 by attaching lid 26 to canister neck 20 . Because fuel canister 12 is permanently sealed, as described above, torch 10 may be moved and stored during non-use in any desired or convenient position without spilling or leaking of fuel in canister 12 . For example, torch 10 may be laid down in its side on a shelf in a garage or garage floor without spilling or leaking of fuel, or be placed in the trunk or backseat of an automobile and be transported to another location without requiring special care to avoid spilling of fuel or leakage from the container. Additionally, and as noted previously, when canister 12 is depleted, canister 12 is replaced with another pre-filled and sealed fuel canister. When lid 26 is removed from the replacement canister, torch 10 may be utilized with the replacement canister of liquid fuel. [0039] [0039]FIG. 4 is a side view and FIG. 5 is a top view of canister lid 26 (shown in FIG. 1) including an outer portion 80 and an inner portion 82 . Outer portion 80 is fabricated from plastic and includes a rim 84 . Inner portion 82 is fabricated from metal and includes a lower protruding end 86 that fits within rim 84 of outer portion 80 . Inner portion 82 is substantially cylindrical and outer portion 80 includes an aperture 88 through an annular shaped, top surface In one embodiment, an interior of lid inner portion 82 is threaded for secure threaded engagement to canister neck threads 21 (shown in FIG. 3). [0040] In an exemplary embodiment, lid 26 is sized such that outer rim 84 of canister lid 26 can not pass through aperture 58 of heat shield 16 (shown in FIG. 1). Accordingly, when heat shield 16 is lifted away from heat shield support 42 , lid 26 and canister 12 is also lifted from support body 14 . Insertion and removal of canister 12 to and from body 14 , respectively, is therefore facilitated by coupling heat shield 16 to canister 12 . [0041] In an alternative embodiment, canister lid 26 is sized to pass through aperture 68 so that heat shield 16 is not securely coupled to fuel canister 12 . [0042] Canister lid 26 is used to extinguish a flaming wick 56 (shown in FIG. 4) when lid 26 is engaged to canister neck 20 (shown in FIG. 1). Lid metal inner portion 82 extinguishes the flame without melting lid outer portion 80 and without excessive temperature rise of outer lid outer rim 84 . Accordingly, canister lid 26 facilitates safely extinguishing the torch flame by hand with lid 26 without employing a separately stored extinguishing component that may inadvertently lost or damaged. Canister lid 26 is attached to canister neck 20 during non-use of torch 10 to protect wick 24 and wick support 22 from environmental contaminants, exposure, and damage. [0043] In addition, in one embodiment, lid 26 includes a known sealing member 90 , such as gasket to seal canister 12 when lid 26 is attached to canister neck 20 . In a particular embodiment, sealing member 90 is an o-ring gasket seal that prevents leakage of fuel from canister 12 during shipping and handling of torch 10 through the distribution process and further during use and storage by the end-user. In an alternative embodiment, a similar sealing member is included on canister neck 20 , with or without a complementary sealing member in lid 26 . [0044] In still a further embodiment, known child-safe mechanisms are employed to prevent simple removal of canister lid 26 and associated easy access to wick 24 , and possibly to fuel therein. Thus, for example, a push and twist-type assembly is employed to prevent removal of lid 26 from canister 12 except under prescribed circumstances. [0045] While the invention has been described in terms of various specific embodiments, those skilled in the art will recognize that the invention can be practiced with modification within the spirit and scope of the claims.

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